Caramel Bread

The adventures of an Australian girl as she visits Asia and learns Korean. Jam's the name, Korea is the game!

“You are so brave and quiet I forget you are suffering.”

—   Ernest Hemingway (via buddhabrot)

(Source: wordsnquotes, via queenwrens)

nihilnovisubsole:

I came to Lauren Bacall at a bad time in my life.
I was eighteen, and I’d had the rug of my existence pulled from under me. I couldn’t talk to people. I couldn’t dress myself. I had no idea where I’d live on my next birthday, and it only sort of registered with me that I went to college. I was a tall child with a debit card, and I had nothing figured out.
And here were Slim and Vivian Sternwood and Irene Jansen, and they did. Sure, they got into problems, but they could kill a man. Or they could win one. Their choice. They had the will to power, as much as they willed their hair to look perfect every morning.
So I decided one day: I was going to be her. Well, not really. I was going to be the women she played. I brought in pictures of her every time I cut my hair, and I tried to speak with my stomach voice to make it deeper. I was serious. And I was upset when it didn’t work out, but through it all, I told myself: If you can will to power like them, everything will be all right.
I learned later the problem with going from human to onscreen archetype, not least of which being that people don’t work like that. Hollywood is a hanging garden. Expect yourself to look stylist good and sound like a hardboiled script and you’re setting yourself up for failure. But Betty’s characters gave me something to want for myself when I needed it, and even now, they give me an ideal.
I told my mother about it when she came home from work. She couldn’t believe it. “I know,” I said. “I figured at this rate the old broad would outlive me.”
She still will.

nihilnovisubsole:

I came to Lauren Bacall at a bad time in my life.

I was eighteen, and I’d had the rug of my existence pulled from under me. I couldn’t talk to people. I couldn’t dress myself. I had no idea where I’d live on my next birthday, and it only sort of registered with me that I went to college. I was a tall child with a debit card, and I had nothing figured out.

And here were Slim and Vivian Sternwood and Irene Jansen, and they did. Sure, they got into problems, but they could kill a man. Or they could win one. Their choice. They had the will to power, as much as they willed their hair to look perfect every morning.

So I decided one day: I was going to be her. Well, not really. I was going to be the women she played. I brought in pictures of her every time I cut my hair, and I tried to speak with my stomach voice to make it deeper. I was serious. And I was upset when it didn’t work out, but through it all, I told myself: If you can will to power like them, everything will be all right.

I learned later the problem with going from human to onscreen archetype, not least of which being that people don’t work like that. Hollywood is a hanging garden. Expect yourself to look stylist good and sound like a hardboiled script and you’re setting yourself up for failure. But Betty’s characters gave me something to want for myself when I needed it, and even now, they give me an ideal.

I told my mother about it when she came home from work. She couldn’t believe it. “I know,” I said. “I figured at this rate the old broad would outlive me.”

She still will.

valyrianswords:

GET TO KNOW ME MEME:

[2/10] favorite female characters:  yona (snowpiercer)

(via belinsky)

jcleyendecker:

My ten personal favorite artworks by JC Leyendecker. It is interesting that many of them happen to be Easter illustrations!

(via rexobxo)

amoosebouche:

I’ve been itching to share this for a while now. My last project was Cinderella, and since there’s already one version of Cinderella for Far Faria, I decided to do a Filipino version version just to mix it up. 

You can download the app to read it here! 

(via hyperbali)

debutart:

Bye Bye Beauty.
Lauren Bacall by Sarah Howell

debutart:

Bye Bye Beauty.

Lauren Bacall by Sarah Howell

The basis of most arguments against trans people is that we are not who we say we are, that we are always and only the gender that we were assigned at birth. And so much of that is about having a sense of certainty around gender, that when you were born with a certain set of genitalia, then that must dictate your entire life, and the reality is that that’s not trueA lot of people are not comfortable with that, because then that means they have to begin to question who they are.- Laverne Cox

(Source: sassyhendrix, via queerravenclaw)

harry potter + objects

(Source: seerspirit, via rosed-tyler)

hyperbali:

the whole time i was drawing this i had a really beautiful alto version of ‘i can go the distance’ playing in my head…now if only i could actually find that voice, lmao
anyway, have a femme hercules, who seems to most regularly suffer from the ‘suddenly super slender’ syndrome when drawn as not a dude

hyperbali:

the whole time i was drawing this i had a really beautiful alto version of ‘i can go the distance’ playing in my head…now if only i could actually find that voice, lmao

anyway, have a femme hercules, who seems to most regularly suffer from the ‘suddenly super slender’ syndrome when drawn as not a dude

(Source: lightthefuze, via melonylotseven)